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Welcome to Faith For Today!

Faith For Today is a television ministry committed to sharing God’s grace with the world through broadcast media. That’s been our mission since 1950, when Faith For Today launched its live inspirational television drama on ABC from New York City, making us the longest running religious television broadcast in the world!

Today, Faith For Today produces a family of programs, including Lifestyle Magazine and Mad About Marriage. We’ve expanded to include Internet ministry, live seminars, and community events.

Please take a moment to explore our site and see what we have to offer. Feel free to drop us a note or give us a call, we’d love to hear from you. Thanks for visiting!

We are committed to sharing God’s grace through broadcast media, and we need your help in our worldwide outreach!

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Monday May 21st

Faith For Today

Faith Moment
Vision

Thomas Watson Sr. was forty years old when he became general manager of a little firm that made meat slicers, time clocks, and punch-card machines. He recognized the potential of a machine used for processing and storing information, that is, a computer, ten years before it began to be used commercially. To match his vision, he renamed his company "International Business Machines Corporation."

Toward the end of his life he was asked at what point he envisioned IBM becoming so big, and he answered, "Right at the beginning."

I don’t know if the charter members of our church envisioned Arlington becoming what it is today, but God did! He saw today and beyond! It is only as we catch His vision that we become anything of substance.

However, we dare not become satisfied with what has been accomplished during the past 40 years.

While serving as the CEO of Pepsi, Wayne Calloway said, “You should have more dreams than memories. If you don’t, you’re in trouble.”

With Love,
Mike
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Friday May 18th

Faith For Today

Faith Moment
Building Bridges

Once upon a time, two brothers who lived on adjoining farms fell into conflict. It was the first serious rift in their 40 years of working together. It began with a small misunderstanding, and grew into a major difference, and finally exploded into an exchange of bitter words followed by weeks of silence. One morning, there was a knock on John's door. He opened it to find a man with a carpenter's toolbox. "I'm looking for a few days' work," he said. "Perhaps you would have a few small jobs here and there that I could help with?

Yes," said the older brother. "I do have a job for you. Look across the creek at that farm. That's my younger brother! Last week, there was a meadow between us, but he took his bulldozer and dug a small river between us. Well I'm going to do him one better. See that pile of old lumber? I want you to build an 8 foot high fence between us. Then I won't need to see his place or his face anymore." The carpenter said, "Show me the nails and the tools, and I'll do a good job for you."

The older brother had to go to town, so he left for the day. At sunset, when he returned, this eyes opened wide, and his jaw dropped. There was no fence there at all. The carpenter had built a bridge that stretched from one side of the river to the other, with handrails and all! And his younger brother, was coming toward them, his hand outstretched. "You're quite the guy," he said, "after all I've said and done." The two brothers met in the middle, and shook each other's hand. They turned to see the carpenter leaving. "No, wait! Stay a few days. I've a lot of other projects for you," said the older brother. "I'd love to," the carpenter said, "but I have many more bridges to build."

When you and I come to the end of our days, just remember this: God won't ask what kind of car we drove, but He will ask how many people we helped get where they needed to go. He won't ask how big our house was, but He will ask how many people we welcomed into our home. God won't ask what neighborhood we lived in, but He will ask how we treated our neighbors. And He won't ask how many fences we made, but He will ask how many bridges we built.

With Love,
Mike
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Wednesday May 16th

Faith For Today

FAITH MOMENT

ADVERSITY

In 1993, author Charles Colson received the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. The $1 million prize is the largest prize for achievement in any field. It is ranked higher than the Nobel prize in such fields as science and literature, in the belief that religion is more important to human existence.

Colson, having served seven months in prison for obstructing justice in the Watergate cover-up, was known as the scandal's "hatchet man." But his spiritual conversion later led to the founding of Prison Fellowship in 1976.

In response to this award, Colson said, "Out of tragedy and adversity come great blessings. I shudder to think of what I would have been if I had not gone to prison."

Adversity is a painful experience, but by God’s grace it is possible for great good to come from such experiences.

Adversity can be God's refining fire. I don’t know why bad things may have happened in your life. However, my own experience tells me that in spite of the pain, great good can come from very bad things. Don’t give up! Don’t hate the refiner’s fire. Trust God during the dark days and He will guide you through to a better tomorrow.
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